For most drivers, a trip to the fuel pump is an easy reminder of the day-to-day cost of gasoline or diesel. But for electric vehicle (EV) drivers, who typically charge their car at home, there isn’t a similar measurement to determine the cost of driving on electricity. To help both current and potential EV drivers better understand the cost of driving an EV, the Energy Department created the 'eGallon'.

According to the Dept. of Energy's new website, the eGallon represents the cost of fueling a vehicle with electricity compared to a similar vehicle that runs on gasoline. For example, if gasoline costs $3.60 a gallon in your state and the eGallon price for your state is $1.20, that means that for $1.20 worth of electricity you can drive the same distance as you would for $3.60 worth of gasoline.

How much does it cost to commute to work or drive across town? The price of gasoline is posted at every corner gas station, but what about the cost of driving on electricity? The Department of Energy’s eGallon provides a quick and simple answer to this question and allows electric vehicle (EV) drivers to see how much they can save on fuel by using electricity instead of gasoline.

The folks at 'eGallon' say that if you chart the price of gasoline and the eGallon price over time, you’ll notice something else. Gasoline prices often spike up and down erratically because they’re linked to international oil markets.

As we all know, events half a world away --or even regionally, as in the Great Lakes region-- can drive up the price we pay at the pump. High prices and uncertainty are a heavy burden for American consumers. On the other hand, the cost of electricity is regional and much more stable, so you generally don’t have to worry about the wild gyrations seen in gas prices.

You just have to overcome the initial sticker shock of purchasing the vehicle, but as we've reported, EV prices are coming down. Still too high for me, but let's wait and see!